Pushing for a move to senior housing isn’t a good idea

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If anyone should win an award for being too pushy, it’s probably me.  I can’t seem to take “no” for an answer, and I don’t mind throwing all of my powers of logic and persuasion into the argument to help make it harder for the other person to deny my position.  But, when it comes to senior housing, trying to convince someone who doesn’t want to move is a bad idea.  Here’s why:

  1. Their stubbornness isn’t based on logic.  Well, at least not the type of logic that you’re probably employing.  The problem with arguing about a person’s safety and comfort is that they don’t view the decision in those terms.  A large number of seniors view the move to assisted living or a nursing home as an admission of weakness, or worse, that the end is near.  Giving up one’s home and autonomy isn’t something that they want to do because it implies that they’ve lost relevance. So, any arguments you make, no matter how persuasive, will likely fall on deaf ears.
  2. For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. The more you push, the more they’ll push, the more they’ll hate you.  Your best bet is to help them discover senior housing on their own.
  3. Do you really want to be “that” person? There is a fine line between being a crusading child who cares about a loved one and being a crusading child trying to push through his/her own agenda.  While you may see yourself as the savior in the situation, you might also be turning people off with your tactics.

If you feel that there are safety concerns associated with your loved one staying home alone, then you have some options:

  1. Begin documenting health and behavioral problems. The more data that you can bring to the table, the better prepared you’ll be for future discussions.  Having a demonstrated pattern of behavior or health problems can help convince otherwise reticent family members that there is truly a problem.
  2. Call a family meeting. Inevitably, there will be one family member who says, “Everything is fine, Mom’s just a little confused.” There will be another family member who wants to send Mom to a nursing home as soon as possible.  The trick is to lay out all of the information and craft a plan so that everyone feels more comfortable with the situation.
  3. Considering hiring help. The easiest way to delay a move to a nursing home is to hire someone to come in and help on a daily basis.  This has a few benefits: not only will someone be there to report back on Mom’s progress, but Mom will also have someone making sure that she eats and bathes on a regular basis.
  4. Focus on quality of life. Being able to prepare your loved one for life in a new community is your greatest asset as a caregiver.  Having scheduled transportation and an active social calendar can help give seniors back some of the independence they may be losing by staying at home.  Focusing on the benefits of such an arrangement is to your advantage.  Another option, especially for seniors who have had surgery or need short-term help, is to emphasize how temporary the move can be.  Once they regain their strength, they’ll head back home.

While almost all seniors have qualms with giving up their independence, most will eventually realize when they can no longer live on their own.  Unfortunately, that realization may take longer than you would like.  Rather than try to force someone to move when they aren’t ready, take time to understand why they’re reluctant to move.  Don’t try to reach a conclusion in one sitting.  Instead, focus on small changes that can improve your loved one’s quality of life and help give you peace of mind.

Median nursing home cost is $77,000, the feds are investigating a nursing home company, older adults don’t want to relive life, and getting roommates is cool now

$77000

The median cost of a nursing home is not about $77,000 a year.

There’s a federal investigation right now into Emeritus, a big nursing home company in the US.

Older adults don’t want time machines as much as younger adults.

Would you want to live like the Golden Girls?

New Personalized Senior Housing Report!

Dear Readers,

I’ve been revamping some of my offerings, and many of you have asked for a more personalized approach to your senior housing needs.  So, I’ve created a personalized senior housing report just for readers of this blog.  This means that you don’t have to wait for me to write about your community. You can just print out the questionnaire below, fill it out, and mail it to me. I’ll send you back your personalized report within two weeks of receipt, and I’ll be available to answer all of your questions after I finish.

Personalized Report Questionnaire

Sample Report

As always, you can email me any time with questions or concerns, and I’ll do my best to answer them: questions@SeniorHousingMove.com.

If you want to learn even more, check out my books (“Continuing Care Retirement Communities: An Insider Tells All” and The Financial & Estate Planners’ Guide to Continuing Care Retirement Communities“) on Amazon.

Virginia speaking to the The Financial Planning Association of Oregon and Southwest Washington.

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Some of the comments:

“I found your presentation extremely valuable and relevant to my practice.”

“I loved your presentation today, excellent information and you were so engaging, my whole table was very impressed with you.”

Thanks, Portland!

Older minds retain more information, residents suing CCRC, a third of patients are harmed during treatment, and the worst aspect of dementia

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Older minds retain more information.

Residents are suing Vi, a CCRC chain over the use of their entrance fees.

One third of nursing home patients are harmed during treatment.

One of the worst aspects of dementia: Sometimes patients don’t even know that they’re ill.