Understanding a CCRC’s “permanent transfer” policy

There are three things that I think everyone should understand about their move into a CCRC: the community’s amount of debt, the community’s entrance fee refund policy, and the community’s policy on permanent transfers to assisted living or nursing.  Today we’ll talk a bit more about the third one: permanent transfers.
When you move into a CCRC, you agree to move to a higher level of care in the event that you can’t stay in live alone anymore.  It’s called “permanent transfer” because they assume that you will never move back into independent living and thus can resell your apartment to someone else.
There are a few things you should note about CCRCs permanent transfer policy:
The community will decide when you have to move. By and large, almost all CCRC contracts have policies regarding residents who can no longer live on their own.  Due to the sensitive nature of the decision, most contracts require that the community’s executive director and its director of nursing sign off on the transfer.
You don’t have much say in the process. While the community will often consult you and your family about the move, you generally won’t have too much of a say.  This makes sense if you think about it.  Especially for residents who have dementia or other cognitive problems, it can be hard to spot one’s own inability to live independently. However, some seniors bristle at the idea of someone else telling them when they must move out of their independent living apartments.

Read your contract.  Policies vary from community to community, so read your documents carefully. In most cases, your doctor, the community’s head nurse, and administrators must “vote” in favor of your permanent move.  If you disagree, then you’ll have to either prove your independence or move out.  It sounds drastic, but that’s the way it’s handled in most places.

The benefits to the CCRC are many.  For one, the community can ensure resident safety by moving people who need more care to assisted living or nursing.  They can also resell the apartment, which improves their bottom line.

While permanent transfer policies help residents who are in denial of their conditions get the additional help that they need, sometimes there are disagreements.  Unfortunately, they usually work out in favor of the community.  So, if you’re not moving into a community that allows aging in place, it’s in your best interest to read and understand the permanent transfer policy.  It’s probably one of the most important things that you can do before signing on the dotted line.

Want to learn more about senior housing? Check out these posts:

Is it cheaper to stay at home or move into a CCRC?

How do I time my move into a CCRC?

Thoughts on the Frontline documentary about assisted living.

The naked truth about entrance fee refunds.