Researching nursing homes, assisted living in Mexico, crazy causes for dementia symptoms, and complaining to Medicare

Reading glasses help seniors in hospitals

Finding a nursing home isn’t simple, but lots of research generally pays off.

Would you move to Mexico for assisted living?

Diabetes can cause dementia symptoms if left untreated. Another culprit: hearing loss.

How to complain to Medicare.

UnSCAMable Book Excerpt: A Basic Test of Internet Trustworthiness

You can learn more about my book, “UnSCAMable” on Amazon.

Danger

I’ll be going over a lot of different types of scams that happen online, but they all boil down to trusting the wrong people.  At the end of the day, you must make a judgment call on whether or not to let new people and organizations into your life.  The decision you make here is key, since going along with a scam could put you in financial danger, or (at the very least) make you a target for other scam artists.

There are three basic questions that you should ask yourself every single time you get a communication from someone who isn’t a close friend (be it online or in real life):

  1. Why is this person contacting me?
  2. Does this really make sense?
  3. Would I be embarrassed if my kids or friends found me reading this?

Let’s review them individually: 

Why is this person contacting me?

There’s an old saying that goes something like this: If you can’t find the fool at the table, then it’s you.  That’s the way it works on the internet.  Here are some common scenarios that can seem legitimate upon first glance but actually aren’t:

  • The person has inherited a lot of money and wants you to help her get it to the United States.
  • The person has uncovered a horrible truth about the future of the United States and wants to warn you about the impending economic collapse.
  • The person has secret political information about a massive scandal that she wants to share with you.
  • The person has uncovered a secret (insert medical problem like “wrinkles,” “gout,” or “obesity”) cure and wants to share it with you.

Ask yourself this question: Why on earth would this person care about me? If he/she really had a cure/secret/bazillion dollars, then why would he/she be emailing me?

The answer to all of these questions is that this person wants your money.  Let’s look at the above again.  In every single case, the communication is designed to separate you from your money.  It may just be a book or a bottle of magic potion, but every single one of these people has contacted you purely to separate you and your money.  Therefore, you should immediately be skeptical of anything (and likely everything) they say.

Furthermore, you should ask yourself how they got your email in the first place.  If you don’t know the person socially, then they’re likely sending out massive amounts of emails, hoping to catch one or two gullible people.

Does this really make sense?

Do any of the examples in the previous section really make sense?  Sure, they’re all plausible.  They all could possibly happen.  But, when you step back and think about it, do any of them sound true?

You might be saying, “Well, you’re just a young person who doesn’t know what’s really going on in the world today!  Things are different!  There is a lot happening right now!”

I concede that it’s possible that there is a massive government conspiracy to overthrow American ideals and usher us into a new age of poverty and strife.  I read about NSA surveillance and wars in the Middle East with just the same worry and concern that you do.  But, I don’t read or respond to emails from people trying to capitalize on my fears.  If you find yourself fearful for your future or safety at the end of an email, then you can bet money that they’re trying to scam you.

Would I be embarrassed if my kids or friends found me reading this?

The ultimate litmus test is whether or not your friends or family would be concerned to see you reading whatever it is that you’re reading.  Instead of the old “What would Jesus do?” test, let’s start a new one, “What would my kids do?”

The reason that this test is so helpful is that it takes out the story element of the email pitch.  In other words, you might be so worked up about the contents of an email that you can’t evaluate it unemotionally.  Why not ask someone else to do it for you?  The beauty of asking a dispassionate person for their opinion is that you’ll get an honest answer about whether or not this particular email or webpage is a fake.

If you’re at all embarrassed about looking like a fool, then alarm bells should be going off in your head regarding the validity of this particular email or webpage. 

Putting it to the Test

Use this test: when you get any sort of suspicious email, phone call, or message

Test:

1)    Why is this person contacting me?

  1. I don’t know why (3 points)
  2. I know this person, and it’s a friendly email  (1 point)
  3. This person is trying to offer me a job, get me to help them with transferring cash, or sell me a book/video/product that the government doesn’t want me to know about (5 points)

2)    Does this really make sense?

  1. Yes (1 point)
  2. No (5 points)
  3. I’m not sure (3 points)

3)    Would I be embarrassed if my kids or friends found me reading this?

  1. Yes (10 points)
  2. No (1 point)

Key:

3-5 points It’s probably not a scam, but do a bit of extra research just to make sure.
6-19 points It might be a scam.  Call your friends/kids and ask for their opinion.  Read the rest of this book and do more research into the topic.
20 points It’s almost certainly a scam.  Call the police if you have given any money or personal information to the crooks.  Otherwise, discontinue all contact with the individual or the company.

Here are some more interesting topics that you can read about on SeniorHousingMove.com:

Taking your pet to senior housing.

I built a scam website in 4 hours.  Here’s what you need to know to protect yourself.

The Naked Truth about Entrance Fees

Understanding a CCRC’s Permanent Transfer Policy.

New email scams, retirement is becoming more difficult, helping parents control money better, and finding an assisted living roommate

Danger

A new scam is out there: Don’t open any emails sending you condolences about your “dead friend.”

Retirement is going to become more difficult all around the globe.

Giving your aging parent a prepaid debit card might help them maintain independence but also prevent fraud.

Assisted living with a roommate may help make it more affordable for more seniors.

Farm to table dining at a retirement community, hackers, end-of-life planning, and CCRC residents suing a community

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A retirement community in Massachusetts is going “farm-to-table” in its dining hall.

Hackers got into the database of an assisted living company.

4 things every patient should know about end-of-life planning.

CCRC residents are suing a community for not having a reserve account to refund residents’ entrance fees.

The best gift this Christmas?

books

Ok, so maybe it’s not the absolute best present that you can get, but…

If you’re stumped on what to get your favorite senior for Christmas, consider some of the books available from Senior Housing Move.com!

Continuing Care Retirement Communities: An Insider Tells All (Print | Kindle)

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The Financial Planner’s Guide to Continuing Care Retirement Communities (Print | Kindle)

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UnSCAMable: How Seniors can Protect Themselves on the Internet (Print | Kindle)

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If you think about it, knowledge is the best gift that you can give, right?

Blood pressure & Alzheimer’s, making the move to assisted living, caring for dementia patients, and a lawsuit against a retirement community

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Common blood pressure meds can cut the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Figuring out when a loved one needs assisted living can be tough.

Learning to care for a dementia patient is slightly easier now: there’s a free online course for it.

Holiday Retirement is being sued by veterans for misleading advertising claims.

 

Home Health Compare

I must admit that home health isn’t my biggest area of expertise. Although I probably know more about that than the typical consumer, I still had no idea how to go about selecting a home health provider. But, today I stumbled across someone who works in the field. She mentioned a website called Home Health Compare.

Home Health Compare is managed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid and specializes in rating home health agencies. Since most home health is paid for by the government, home health agencies are also rated by the government.  Here’s the website:  http://www.medicare.gov/homehealthcompare

Home Health Compare is pretty easy to use.  First, type in a city or ZIP code.  You can also search by home health agency.

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The next page will give you a summary of service providers in your area.  When you click on a provider, it will give you a summary of their services:

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You’ll notice that there are three tabs at the top of the page.  Those tabs show you quality scores and patient satisfaction.  For example, clicking on “Quality of Patient Care” will show you this:

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You can also click on the “Patient Survey Results” tab to learn more about how patients rated the service.

I personally would not choose a home health agency that hadn’t been rated in both of these areas.  I also wouldn’t choose one that had ratings lower than the state average.  However, you can pick and choose among providers using this service and even compare up to three different companies.